Alternate Species

General

Hardwoods of the Pacific Northwest. Oregon State University, Forest Research Lab, Resource Contribution 8.

Silvics of North America. Volume 1, Conifers. Volume 2, Hardwoods. USDA Forest Service, Agriculture Handbook 654. 1990. These books describe the silvical characteristics of about 200 conifers and hardwood trees in the conterminous United States, Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico.  Many topics are covered for each species, including habitat, climate, soils and topography, associated forest cover, life history, seedling development, growth and yield, rooting habitat, reaction of competition, damaging agents, special uses, and genetics

Red AlderRed alder stand

Evaluation of Site Quality for Red Alder, by Constance Harrington and Paul Courtin. Pages 141-158 in Hibbs, D.E., D.S. Management of Red Alder. Corvallis, OR: Oregon State University Press. 256 p.

A Method of Site Quality Evaluation for Red Alder, by Constance Harrington. U.S. Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, General Technical Report GTR-192. 1986.

Where Should I Plant Red Alder? by Connie Harrington.  Presentation made to Lewis County Farm Forestry Association, April 18, 2018. 27 minutes.

Red alder: a state of knowledge. USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, General Technical Report GTR-669.

Growing red alder, in Forest Management for Small Landowners, by Bryon Loucks. 2020.

Bigleaf Maple

The ecology and silviculture of bigleaf maple.  British Columbia Ministry of Forests, Extension Note 33. 1999.

Bigleaf maple managers' handbook for British Columbia. Miscellaneous Report 090. 1999.

If you are interested in tapping bigleaf maple for syrup, visit the web page of resources prepared by WSU Forestry Extension.

Western Redcedar

Growing western redcedar, in Forest Management for Small Landowners, by Bryon Loucks. 2020.

Oregon White Oak

Planting native oak in the Pacific Northwest, by Warren D. Devine and Constance Harrington. USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, General Technical Report PNW-GTR-804. 2010. 25 p.

Pacific Madrone

Although madrone is not considered to be a commercial timber species, it is a native tree some people are interested in.  Washington State University maintains a web site of research information on the species.